February, 2018

THE COFFEE BREAK - 9:00 AM (Mon-Fri) - sponsored by Royal Cup Coffee

BRUSH OF WINGS

by Karen Kingsbury - read by Anne Tedlie (10 episodes - 2/1/18-2/14/18)

From author Karen Kingsbury comes the third novel in the unforgettable Angels Walking series about divine intervention and the trials and triumphs of life for a group of friends. Despite needing a heart transplant and against the advice of her doctor, Mary Catherine moves to Uganda to work at a brand new orphanage. Whatever time she has left, Mary Catherine wants to spend it helping children -- especially since there will be no children of her own. The only problem is Major League Baseball player Marcus Dillinger, the man she never meant to fall in love with.

BLOOD AT THE ROOT

by Patrick Phillips - read by Ron Martz (10 episodes - 2/15/18-2/28/18)

After the sudden death of her husband, Sheryl Sandberg felt certain that she and her children would never feel pure joy again. "I was in 'the void, '" she writes, "a vast emptiness that fills your heart and lungs and restricts your ability to think or even breathe." Her friend Adam Grant, a psychologist at Wharton, told her there are concrete steps people can take to recover and rebound from life-shattering experiences. We are not born with a fixed amount of resilience. It is a muscle A gripping tale of racial cleansing in Forsyth County, Georgia, and a harrowing testament to the deep roots of racial violence in America. Forsyth County, Georgia, at the turn of the twentieth century was home to a large African American community that included ministers and teachers, farmers and field hands, tradesmen, servants, and children. Many black residents were poor sharecroppers, but others owned their own farms and the land on which they'd founded the county's thriving black churches.


THE MORNING BOOK @ 10:00 AM (Mon-Fri)

MARCH: BOOK ONE

by John Lewis, Andrew Aydin and Nate Powell - read by Paula Ferguson (3 episodes - 2/5/18-2/7/18)

Congressman John Lewis (GA-5) is an American icon, one of the key figures of the civil rights movement. His commitment to justice and nonviolence has taken him from an Alabama sharecropper's farm to the halls of Congress, from a segregated schoolroom to the 1963 March on Washington, and from receiving beatings from state troopers to receiving the Medal of Freedom from the first African-American president. March is a vivid first-hand account of John Lewis' lifelong struggle for civil and human rights, meditating in the modern age on the distance traveled since the days of Jim Crow and segregation.

MARCH: BOOK TWO

by John Lewis, Andrew Aydin and Nate Powell - read by Paula Ferguson (4 episodes - 2/8/18-2/13/18)

Congressman John Lewis, continues his award-winning graphic novel trilogy with co-writer Andrew Aydin and artist Nate Powell, inspired by a 1950s comic book that helped prepare his own generation to join the struggle. Now, March brings the lessons of history to vivid life for a new generation, urgently relevant for today's world.

MARCH: BOOK THREE

by John Lewis, Andrew Aydin and Nate Powell - read by Paula Ferguson (5 episodes - 2/14/18-2/20/18)

The stunning conclusion of the award-winning and best-selling MARCH trilogy. Congressman John Lewis, an American icon and one of the key figures of the civil rights movement, joins co-writer Andrew Aydin and artist Nate Powell to bring the lessons of history to vivid life for a new generation, urgently relevant for today's world.

UNSCRIPTED

by Ernie Johnson, Jr. - read by James Duffy Hickey (6 episodes - 2/21/17-2/28/17)

Ernie Johnson Jr. has been in the game a long time. With one of the most recognized voices in sports broadcasting, he is a tireless perfectionist when it comes to preparing and delivering his commentary. Yet he knows that some of sports' greatest triumphs -- and life's greatest rewards -- come from those unscripted moments you never anticipated. In this heartfelt, gripping autobiography, the three-time Sports Emmy Award-winner and popular host of TNT's Inside the NBA provides a remarkably candid look at his life both on and off the screen.

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PUBLISHERS BEST BOOK - 10:00 PM (Mon-Sat)

DOWN A DARK ROAD

by Linda Castillo - read by Darlene French White (11 episodes - 2/2/18-2/14/18)

In this electrifying new thriller in the bestselling series, a convicted murderer is on the run and Chief of Police Kate Burkholder must catch him before he strikes again.

THE BEAR AND THE NIGHTINGALE

by Katherine Arden - read by Dannaudra Jackson (13 episodes - 2/15/18-3/1/18)

TAt the edge of the Russian wilderness, winter lasts most of the year and the snowdrifts grow taller than houses. But Vasilisa doesn't mind--she spends the winter nights huddled around the embers of a fire with her beloved siblings, listening to her nurse's fairy tales. Above all, she loves the chilling story of Frost, the blue-eyed winter demon, who appears in the frigid night to claim unwary souls. Wise Russians fear him, her nurse says, and honor the spirits of house and yard and forest that protect their homes from evil.


FOR LATE LISTENERS - 11:00 PM (Mon-Sat)

THE GIRL WITH THE LOWER BACK TATTOO

by Amy Schumer - read by Lauren May (11 episodes, 2/1/18-2/13/18)

A field guide to the twenty-first century, written by one of its most celebrated observers. In his most ambitious work to date, Thomas L. Friedman shows that we have entered an age of dizzying acceleration--and explains how to live in it. Due to an exponential increase in computing power, climbers atop Mount Everest enjoy excellent cell-phone service and self-driving cars are taking to the roads. A parallel explosion of economic interdependency has created new riches as well as spiraling debt burdens. Meanwhile, Mother Nature is also seeing dramatic changes as carbon levels rise and species go extinct, with compounding results.

HOUSE OF SPIES

by Daniel Silva - read by Jim Beattie (15 episodes - 2/14/18-3/2/18)

Now, in House of Spies, Gabriel Allon is back and out for revenge - determined to hunt down the world's most dangerous terrorist, a shadowy ISIS mastermind known only as Saladin. Four months after the deadliest attack on the American homeland since 9/11, terrorists leave a trail of carnage through London's glittering West End. The attack is a brilliant feat of planning and secrecy, but with one loose thread.


FOR NIGHT OWLS - 12:00 AM (Tues-Sun)

THE CUBAN AFFAIR

by Nelson DeMille - read by Tom Jowers (14 episodes, 2/2/18-2/17/18)

Daniel Graham MacCormick -- Mac for short -- seems to have a pretty good life. At age thirty-five he's living in Key West, owner of a forty-two-foot charter fishing boat, The Maine. Mac served five years in the Army as an infantry officer with two tours in Afghanistan. He returned with the Silver Star, two Purple Hearts, scars that don't tan, and a boat with a big bank loan. Truth be told, Mac's finances are more than a little shaky. One day, Mac is sitting in the famous Green Parrot Bar in Key West, contemplating his life, and waiting for Carlos, a hotshot Miami lawyer heavily involved with anti-Castro groups. Carlos wants to hire Mac and The Maine for a ten-day fishing tournament to Cuba at the standard rate, but Mac suspects there is more to this and turns it down. The price then goes up to two million dollars, and Mac agrees to hear the deal, and meet Carlos's clients -- a beautiful Cuban-American woman named Sara Ortega, and a mysterious older Cuban exile, Eduardo Valazquez.

ANYTHING IS POSSIBLE

by Elizabeth Strout - read by Bob Brier (9 episodes, 2/18/18-2/28/18)

Short story collection Anything Is Possible explores the whole range of human emotion through the intimate dramas of people struggling to understand themselves and others. Here are two sisters: one trades self-respect for a wealthy husband while the other finds in the pages of a book a kindred spirit who changes her life. The janitor at the local school has his faith tested in an encounter with an isolated man he has come to help; a grown daughter longs for mother love even as she comes to accept her mother's happiness in a foreign country; and the adult Lucy Barton (the heroine of My Name Is Lucy Barton) returns to visit her siblings after seventeen years of absence.


OVERNIGHT BOOK - 2:00 AM (Tues-Sun)

UNBELIEVABLE: MY FRONT-ROW SEAT TO THE CRAZIEST CAMPAIGN IN AMERICAN HISTORY

by Jason Miller - read by Susan Sweeney (10 episodes, 2/1/18-2/11/18)

Called "disgraceful," "third-rate," and "not nice" by Donald Trump, NBC News correspondent Katy Tur reported on -- and took flak from -- the most captivating and volatile presidential candidate in American history. From day 1 to day 500, Tur documented Trump's inconsistencies, fact-checked his falsities, and called him out on his lies. In return, Trump repeatedly singled out Tur. He tried to charm her, intimidate her, and shame her. At one point, he got a crowd so riled up against her, Secret Service agents had to walk her to her car. None of it worked. Facts are stubborn.

MADAME PRESIDENT

by Helene Cooper - read by Maurice Glatzer (14 episodes, 3/13/18-2/28/18)

The harrowing, but triumphant story of Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, leader of the Liberian women's movement, winner of the Nobel Peace Prize, and the first democratically elected female president in African history. When Ellen Johnson Sirleaf won the 2005 Liberian presidential election, she demolished a barrier few thought possible, obliterating centuries of patriarchal rule to become the first female elected head of state in Africa's history.


CLASSIC BOOKS - 4:00 PM (Sat-Sun) - Sponsored by the Kiwanis Club of Atlanta.

DOUBLE INDEMNITY

by American author James M. Cain - read by Tom Jowers (4 episodes - 01/27/18-02/04/18)

Tautly narrated and excruciatingly suspenseful, Double Indemnity gives us an X-ray view of guilt, of duplicity, and of the kind of obsessive, loveless love that devastates everything it touches. First published in 1935, this novel reaffirmed James M. Cain as a virtuoso of the roman noir.

SO LONG A LETTER

by Senegalese author Mariama Ba - read by Paula Ferguson (4 episodes - 2/10/18-2/18/18)

This novel is in the form of a letter, written by the widowed Ramatoulaye and describing her struggle for survival. It is the winner of the Noma Award. Mariama Ba (1929 - 1981)) was a Senegalese author and feminist, who wrote in French. Born in Dakar, she was raised a Muslim, but at an early age came to criticise what she perceived as inequalities between the sexes resulting from [African] traditions.

CARVER: A LIFE IN POEMS

edited by the English author Marilyn Nelson - read by Tiffany Harlow (2 episodes - 2/24/18-2/25/18)

George Washington Carver was born a slave in Missouri about 1864 and was raised by the childless white couple who had owned his mother. In 1877 he left home in search of an education, eventually earning a master's degree. In 1896, Booker T. Washington invited Carver to start the agricultural department at the all-black-staffed Tuskegee Institute, where he spent the rest of his life seeking solutions to the poverty among landless black farmers by developing new uses for soil-replenishing crops such as peanuts, cowpeas, and sweet potatoes. Carver's achievements as a botanist and inventor were balanced by his gifts as a painter, musician, and teacher.